Make a Positive Choice Toward Fighting Cancer

Shelly Stinson Reducing meat intake may help prevent cancer Reducing meat intake may help prevent cancer

Reducing meat intake can be a positive choice when it comes to achieving and maintaining higher levels of health for yourself and your family. The key is finding meatless choices that supply the good nutrients found in meat, without adding the bad.

A Must Eat?

With many diets suggesting that you increase your protein intake in order to build muscle or reduce your cravings, thereby making it easier to lose weight, lean meat is a food item that generally tops the “must eat” list. However, some health organizations, like the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, are now saying that this might not be the greatest advice. Their concern? Cancer.

According to research, people who eliminate meat from their diet have lower incidences of cancer when compared to those who eat this type of food regularly—around 40 percent lower to be exact. Although the meat-cancer link is unclear, it is suggested that the fat and other substances found in meat have a negative effect on the body by increasing hormones associated with cancer development. 

This makes reducing meat intake a positive choice when it comes to achieving and maintaining higher levels of health for yourself and your family. The key is finding meatless choices that supply the good nutrients found in meat, without adding the bad.

Great Meat Substitutes

Because meat contains a high amount of protein, cutting back means that you need to find other sources of this macronutrient for your body to function efficiently. Some healthier high-protein, meatless options include eggs, nuts, seeds, and Greek yogurt. 

Meat also tends to be high in iron as well. Therefore, eating meat-free iron-rich foods like iron-fortified cereal, beans, tofu, pumpkin, squash, apricots, potatoes, and broccoli can help replace this one nutrient that's critical for getting your cells oxygen so you have more energy and feel better.

Tasty Meatless Recipes

Finding healthy meatless recipes that taste good to you and your family can greatly increase the odds that you’ll stick to a plant-based diet. Cooking Light offers a number of them, ranging from satisfying pasta dishes to light and yummy sandwiches to appetizers and desserts, allowing you to choose ones that sound the most appealing.

For instance, maybe you’d like to try their quinoa with leeks and shiitake mushrooms recipe; or perhaps the idea of a cheese pie with peppers makes your mouth water. If you don’t have a lot of time or prefer to stay as far away from the kitchen as possible, you could also juice your way to better health. One woman did this and was able to resolve her skin issues in the process.

Have Fun!

Have fun with it and see what kind of meatless recipes you can create so you stay motivated to follow this type of eating. Get the family involved by encouraging your kids to come up with their own recipes. That makes this type of change a more welcome activity, because they get to take an active role in the process. As a result, it also enables them to start their own eating practices for a lifetime of better health. 

Even if you only eat meatless a couple days a week, every little bit helps. And it could potentially protect you from this one disease that robs too many people of their lives, making it more than worth the effort.

 

Shelly Stinson

Shelly Stinson is a freelance writer based out of Denver, CO. She is always looking for a new health or fitness trend to try (and write about). Follow her adventures on Twitter.

Related articles